Monday, September 15, 2008

Religion in Art

As a person who loves the arts, and hates organized religion, is it strange that I really enjoy religious art work? Particularly dark religious art work? Pieces that show the struggle between man and god, and man questioning god's existence. Even though these works are created by faith filled people, does it joy me to see them struggle with their delusions? But having the education that I have, I also understand that if it weren't for religion, then the arts would not have developed as they had. Maybe I love religious art because of the raw emotion it creates. Even though I don't agree with religious tradition, I do know that they have a place in history and society. Can I bring a piece of artwork with a message of faith and god into my home? I'm not sure. I have not yet. But, I have seen many pieces that could make me cross that line. But for me it is a scary line to cross. What does that make me?

5 comments:

Samuel Skinner said...

It is pretty obvious that alot of artists would have still done work even if it wasn't religious- it just would be differant. For example, alot of the instances we get from Greece were part of the city of Athens beautification project- using money of the Delos league. Yeah- alot of classical art is from pork spending :)

As for the rest... eh- asethitics is a personal choice. As long as you don't deck your house out in propaganda pieces, it should be fine. After all, people have art representing Greek mythology everywhere- of course, unlike the ancients we don't paint them. I guess we like the dead look.

cranky old fart said...

"But for me it is a scary line to cross."

Why?

cranky old fart said...

"But for me it is a scary line to cross."

Why?

atheist girl said...

thats a good question. i guess it is scary because i would feel hypocritical. although i do know if i found the right piece of work id say fuck it and get it anyway.

Glendon Mellow: The Flying Trilobite said...

As a visual arts major and atheist myself, I believe there is no hypocrisy in loving a piece of religious art.

The art is expertise by humans, with allegories fuelled by human stories, and beauty that can be created as a side-benefit of our large brains, ocular system and amazing thumbs and wrists.

Much religious art is gorgeous. As Dawkins once wondered, what grandeur might have been if Michaelangelo painted the Sistine with love of the Mesozoic era in mind?